Tuesday, September 05, 2017

Blog Tour: Pride and Prejudice (Restored) by Jane Austen; Annotated by Sophie Turner - with giveaway!




The novel needs no introduction. But readers may not have realised that we have been losing “Pride and Prejudice” over the years, particularly digitally. Grammar, spelling, and punctuation have eroded significantly from the 1813 Egerton first edition, and many digital copies suffer from poor formatting.

In 2017, the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death, her “darling Child” has been painstakingly restored to the three-volume 1813 first edition. Adjustments have only been made where there were errors in the 1813 text, and are noted in detailed annotations at the end of the novel.

Please enjoy this beloved story, restored to Jane Austen’s original voice.

I am thrilled today to be part of the blog tour for Sophie Turner's new book, Pride and Prejudice (Restored). My thanks also goes to Claudine Pepe for inviting me to take part in this tour.


Thank you so much for hosting me here at Laughing With Lizzie! I’m really excited to share this project with readers, and particularly to share some excerpts, as these show why it was necessary to create a restored edition of Pride and Prejudice, taking it back to the grammar, spelling, and punctuation of the 1813 edition, save errors.



One of the biggest things that had eroded was commas, which you can see in my “before” copy, the Republic of Pemberley’s online text, vs. the “after” edited version.



Before:

The ladies were somewhat more fortunate, for they had the advantage of ascertaining from an upper window that he wore a blue coat, and rode a black horse.



After:

The ladies were somewhat more fortunate, for they had the advantage of ascertaining from an upper window, that he wore a blue coat and rode a black horse.



Before:

"If my children are silly, I must hope to be always sensible of it."



After:

“If my children are silly I must hope to be always sensible of it.”



Jane Austen had a very particular timing with her commas, and her sentences tend to suffer when we shift the comma to the “modern” location, as shown above. They also suffer when inserted to interrupt the flow of her light prose, as in the below examples.



Before:

"You began the evening well, Charlotte," said Mrs. Bennet, with civil self-command, to Miss Lucas. "You were Mr. Bingley's first choice."



After:

You began the evening well, Charlotte,” said Mrs. Bennet with civil self-command to Miss Lucas. “You were Mr. Bingley’s first choice.”



Before:

She would not listen, therefore, to her daughter's proposal of being carried home; neither did the apothecary, who arrived about the same time, think it at all advisable.



After:

She would not listen therefore to her daughter’s proposal of being carried home; neither did the apothecary, who arrived about the same time, think it at all advisable.



Before:

"I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen through, I am afraid, is pitiful."



After:

“I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen through I am afraid is pitiful.”



Before:

Not yet, however, in spite of her disappointment in her husband, did Mrs. Bennet give up the point. She talked to Elizabeth again and again; coaxed and threatened her by turns. She endeavoured to secure Jane in her interest; but Jane, with all possible mildness, declined interfering; and Elizabeth, sometimes with real earnestness, and sometimes with playful gaiety, replied to her attacks. Though her manner varied, however, her determination never did.



After:

Not yet, however, in spite of her disappointment in her husband, did Mrs. Bennet give up the point. She talked to Elizabeth again and again; coaxed and threatened her by turns. She endeavoured to secure Jane in her interest, but Jane with all possible mildness declined interfering;—and Elizabeth sometimes with real earnestness and sometimes with playful gaiety replied to her attacks. Though her manner varied however, her determination never did.



The last example shows that there were often multiple instances of punctuation that needed to be corrected, even within one sentence. Austen often used mdashes in conjunction with other punctuation, and these often tended to get “lost” from digital editions, or formatted as double hyphens, as shown below, where the punctuation should not even be any sort of dash, but instead a comma leading into the dialogue, which Austen very frequently used.



Before:

About the middle of the next day, as she was in her room getting ready for the walk, a sudden noise below seemed to speak the whole house in confusion; and, after listening a moment, she heard somebody running up stairs in a violent hurry, and calling loudly after her. She opened the door and met Maria in the landing-place, who, breathless with agitation, cried out --



"Oh, my dear Eliza! pray make haste and come into the dining-room, for there is such a sight to be seen! I will not tell you what it is. Make haste, and come down this moment."





After

“About the middle of the next day, as she was in her room getting ready for a walk, a sudden noise below seemed to speak the whole house in confusion; and after listening a moment, she heard somebody running up stairs in a violent hurry, and calling loudly after her. She opened the door, and met Maria in the landing place, who, breathless with agitation, cried out,



“Oh, my dear Eliza! pray make haste and come into the dining-room, for there is such a sight to be seen! I will not tell you what it is. Make haste, and come down this moment.”



Here is another instance of improperly formatted and missing dashes, and I think it begins to show how this not only diminishes Austen’s voice, but also degrades the experience for the reader, to not have nice, clean punctuation. It’s also a great example of misplaced commas; with the commas restored you can see Austen’s true rhythm of prose.



Before:

On his quitting the room she sat down, unable to support herself, and looking so miserably ill that it was impossible for Darcy to leave her, or to refrain from saying, in a tone of gentleness and commiseration, "Let me call your maid. Is there nothing you could take to give you present relief? A glass of wine; -- shall I get you one? You are very ill."



After:

On his quitting the room, she sat down, unable to support herself, and looking so miserably ill, that it was impossible for Darcy to leave her, or to refrain from saying, in a tone of gentleness and commiseration, “Let me call your maid. Is there nothing you could take, to give you present relief?—A glass of wine;—shall I get you one?—You are very ill.”



There were also a vast number of instances where commas were substituted for semicolons, or vice versa, as shown in the next example. Austen was decidedly not afraid of using a semicolon, but again there is a certain rhythm to how she uses them. And you can see again a number of instances of commas out of place.



Before:
The good news quickly spread through the house, and with proportionate speed through the neighbourhood. It was borne in the latter with decent philosophy. To be sure, it would have been more for the advantage of conversation had Miss Lydia Bennet come upon the town; or, as the happiest alternative, been secluded from the world, in some distant farm house. But there was much to be talked of in marrying her; and the good-natured wishes of her well-doing which had proceeded before from all the spiteful old ladies in Meryton, lost but little of their spirit in this change of circumstances, because with such an husband her misery was considered certain.

After:
The good news quickly spread through the house; and with proportionate speed through the neighbourhood. It was borne in the latter with decent philosophy. To be sure it would have been more for the advantage of conversation, had Miss Lydia Bennet come upon the town; or, as the happiest alternative, been secluded from the world, in some distant farm house. But there was much to be talked of, in marrying her; and the good-natured wishes for her well-doing, which had proceeded before, from all the spiteful old ladies in Meryton, lost but little of their spirit in this change of circumstances, because with such an husband, her misery was considered certain.


I hope this and my other excerpt posts along the blog tour will give readers an understanding of why I felt doing the restored edition was necessary. These differences may be subtle, but as I wrote in the forward, over time, they eroded Austen’s voice. For the 200th anniversary of her death, I wanted to give her that voice back.


Purchase Links: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo



 












Sophie Turner worked as an online editor before delving even more fully into the tech world. Writing, researching the Regency era, and occasionally dreaming about living in Britain are her escapes from her day job.



She was afraid of long series until she ventured upon Patrick O’Brian’s 20-book Aubrey-Maturin masterpiece, something she might have repeated five times through.



Alas, her Constant Love series is only planned to be seven books right now, and consists of A Constant Love, A Change of Legacies, and the in-progress A Season Lost.



She blogs about her writing endeavours at sophie-turner-acl.blogspot.com, where readers can find direction for the various social drawing-rooms across the Internet where she may be called upon.



** GIVEAWAY - ends Wednesday 20th September **

Sophie has been kind enough to offer a giveaway of an ebook copy of her story, open internationally

Please leave a comment for a chance to win. The giveaway ends on 20th September. I will be in touch with the winner, so please leave your email in your comment. The very best of luck! 



My thanks again goes to Sophie for this interesting explanation about her restoration of a most beloved novel! My thanks also to Claudine for setting up this tour.



Blog Tour Schedule

July 27 / My Vices and Weaknesses/ Guest Post & Giveaway

July 28 / Austenesque Reviews/Book Excerpt & Giveaway

July 29 / My Love for Jane Austen/ Guest Post & Giveaway

August 3 /Just Jane 1813 / Book Review & Giveaway

August 4 / My Jane Austen Book Club/ Guest Post & Giveaway

September 4 / Diary of an Eccentric/ Guest Post & Giveaway

September 5 / Laughing with Lizzie / Book Excerpt & Giveaway

September 6 / Savvy Verse & Wit / Book Review & Giveaway

September 12 / Margie’s Must Reads /Book Review & Giveaway

September 14 / More Agreeably Engaged /Guest Post & Giveaway

September 15 / Babblings of a Bookworm/ Book Excerpt & Giveaway





14 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing this post and being part of this blog tour! The post looks great on your newly designed blog. I hope your readers enjoy reading these excerpts.

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  2. Thank you for all the time it took you to go painstakingly line by line. Congratulations!

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  3. Posting for someone else who was having trouble: Agreed that it is appalling that so many books have been spoiled by poor proofreading/editing. Many thanks for taking the time and effort to honour Jane's original story, and thank you for your generous giveaway offer.

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  4. As I have said elsewhere, "Give this woman a PhD!" I am fascinated by your passion and will read your book no matter what. But it would be great to win a copy 😎😁

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    1. Aww, thanks, Katherine! It was definitely a labour of love.

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  5. What a tedious job! But one done with an intense passion. What a wonderful exquisite giveaway. Good luck everyone!!

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    1. Thanks, monkee -- it was tedious but also worthwhile, as I learned a lot in studying her work this closely.

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  6. It is a wise woman who lends herself to understanding the intricacies of the English language and in doing so, the improvement of her mind (as well as others').

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    1. Hahaha, thank you so much -- great comment! :-)

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  7. I think I've said it elsewhere on this tour but "What a labour of love!" Many congratulations to you Sophie Turner. It's not just correcting and replacing the punctuation but the understanding of how the English language has changed over the course of two hundred years, too. Yes, give the girl a PhD!

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    Replies
    1. Aww, thanks, Anji! It was definitely a labour of love. :-)

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  8. Congratulations on a job well done!

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